A HISTORY OF INNOVATION

In the research lab at Dartmouth led by Professor Lee Lynd, processing cellulosic biomass in a single biological step without added enzymes is a central theme. Such “consolidated bioprocessing” (CBP) is a potential breakthrough, and “is widely considered to be the ultimate low-cost configuration for cellulose hydrolysis and fermentation” (joint DOE/USDA Roadmap, 2007). We are focused on production of ethanol, a promising renewable fuel and fuel intermediate, and the logical first commercialization target for C-CBP. Once demonstrated for ethanol, the CBP strategy is potentially enabling for a broad range of fuels and chemicals.

Enchi Background and Partners

Enchi was founded in 2014 after the yeast-related assets of Mascoma Corp. were purchased by Lallemand Corp. Non-yeast assets received by Enchi as a result of this transaction included a considerable patent estate related to CBP and engineered thermophilic bacteria, to which Enchi has subsequently added.  Enchi’s mission is to develop technology for conversion of cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals at low cost via C-CBP without added enzymes or thermochemical pretreatment. Our business model is to license technology to commercial producers.  This approach is supported by the previous experience of Enchi personnel with Mascoma Corporation, which introduced the first recombinant microbe into the biofuel industry in 2012, resulting in a substantial market share of the yeast in current use for corn ethanol.  The Mascoma experience validated licensing royalties as a chief revenue source and that partnerships involving companies with complementary skill sets are productive.

Between 2007-2011 the Department of Energy Funded $5 MM to Enchi (Mascoma) to develop a set of strains of the bacterium Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum and an associated fermentation process for conversion of hardwood to ethanol.

In 2020 the USDA awarded Enchi a Phase I Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant. Read press release

Our Team

Bill Brady, Chairman

William J. Brady, Jr. is an executive and entrepreneur in the sustainable energy and advanced materials industries. He has successfully led large complex global organizations, and has created value in building emerging technology businesses.

Most recently, Mr. Brady served as President, Chief Executive Officer and a Director of Mascoma Corporation, a leading industrial biotechnology company. Mascoma’s bioconversion products have been used to produce over 3 billion gallons of biofuels. Mascoma was successfully sold to Lallemand Corporation in November 2014.

He is currently Chairman, Director and Co-Founder of Enchi Corporation, an industrial biotechnology company developing advanced organisms to convert cellulosic biomass to fuels.

Previously, Mr. Brady was Executive Vice President of Cabot Corporation, a $3 BN specialty chemical company. Throughout his twenty-three year experience, Mr. Brady held numerous positions at Cabot in the United States and Asia, including General Manager of the $2 Billion Carbon Black business which operated 23 manufacturing plants in 17 countries. Under his leadership, the business completed significant expansions in China and Brazil, and executed a major global initiative in energy efficiency. In addition, he led the commercialization of two start-up businesses at Cabot in ink jet colorants and elastomer composites.

Lee Lynd, CSO

In the research lab at Dartmouth led by Professor Lee Lynd, processing cellulosic biomass in a single biological step without added enzymes is a central theme. Such “consolidated bioprocessing” (CBP) is a potential breakthrough, and “is widely considered to be the ultimate low-cost configuration for cellulose hydrolysis and fermentation” (joint DOE/USDA Roadmap, 2007). We are focused on production of ethanol, a promising renewable fuel. However, theThe CBP strategy is however potentially applicable to a very broad range of fuels and chemicals.

He is the Consolidated Bioprocessing team lead for the Department of Energy Center for Bioenergy Innovation, and the Director of the newly-formed Advanced Second Generation Biofuel Laboratory at the University of Campinas, Brazil.  In the past, he was chairman of the Executive Committee of the Global Sustainable Bioenergy Project, Chief Scientific Officer, Director, and Co-Founder of Mascoma Corporation, co-leader (with Nathanael Greene of the Natural Resources Defense Council) of The Role of Biomass in America’s Energy Future project, and biofuel industry representative on a committee advisory to the executive office of President Clinton on reducing greenhouse gas emission from personal vehicles.

He has three times testified before the US Senate, and has been featured in prominent fora such as Wired, Forbes, Nova, and the Nobel Conference. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and has received numerous awards and honors, including: Inaugural winner of the Lemelson MIT Sustainability Prize for inventions and innovations that enhance economic opportunity and community well-being while protecting and restoring the natural environment, and the Charles D. Scott Award for distinguished contributions to the field of biotechnology for fuels and chemicals.

Christopher Herring, Chief Scientist

Dr. Herring is a scientist and project manager with 20 years experience in the fields of metabolic engineering, industrial microbiology and systems biology. He has worked on a range of topics such as genetic engineering of thermophilic bacteria and microbial genomics. He holds a PhD in Microbiology from the University of Wisconsin and conducted postdoctoral research in a leading systems biology lab.

Previously he was a Senior Scientist at Mascoma Corporation where he was co-PI on a $5 MM grant from the Department of Energy to develop a thermophilic bacterium for ethanol production. He has been a project manager at Dartmouth College and an Adjunct Research Professor at the Thayer School of Engineering.